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Experimental Actions

Archaeological remains and objects are tangible remains of past civilizations. They need to be interpreted to give meaning today, and interpretation is dependent on experiments. Experiments are needed to understand how objects were made, how constructions can have looked like and not the least, how people in the past behaved and acted. In OpenArch, experimental actions will be limited to those that have an immediate result on the visitor experience, or that can be used as visitor attractions by themselves.

Clothing: drum making workshop

The workshop was designed and conducted by Pirjo-Riitta Haimila who is an expert in ancient arts and crafts. The goal was to familiarize with ancient arts and crafts as well as the history of the drum. Feedback from the participants showed that they were very pleased with the content and the outcomes of the workshop.

Course “Basket weaving” by Imke Günzel

The course was designed and conducted by the craftswoman Imke Günzel. It was a course for our educational staff to improve their skills for public demonstrations in producing, presenting and using reconstructed prehistoric woven baskets for our visitors.

Demonstration of prehistoric music instruments by Mario Schramm

Course for our educational staff was designed and conducted by the musician Mario Schramm. It was to improve their skills for public demonstrations in producing, presenting and using reconstructed prehistoric wind instruments esp. lures from the Bronze Age.

Everyday life of the past: primitive pottery making & burning

The experiment was designed and conducted by archaeologist Elsa Hietala with assistance by Miska Sliden. We decided to use Finnish red clay which is of the same kind as they used here in the Stone Age. Our goal was to try pottery burning on open fire and learn the process, since it has not been done in Kierikki before.

Everyday life of the past: Crafting a wooden anthropomorphic statue using wooden, stone and bone tools

The experiment was conducted in front of hundreds of visitors during the Stone Age Market event. The goal was to craft from start to finish a wooden anthropomorphic statue using only Stone Age tools made from wood, bone and stone and studying the demands of this activity on the tools and on the workers using them.

Workshop University of Hamburg August 2011

Over a period of four weeks, archaeology students from the University of Hamburg worked in experimental and public archaeology projects at Albersdorf. They have been dyeing (colouring) wool the prehistoric way, got some experience in bronze casting and built and used a bread oven.

Course “Music in prehistory” by Dr. Jean-Loup Ringot

The course was designed and conducted by the archaeologist Dr. Jean-Loup Ringot. It was meant for our educational staff to improve their skills for public demonstrations in producing, presenting and using reconstructed prehistoric music instruments for our visitors.

Llys Rhosyr Seminar

A large part of St Fagans National History Museum’s commitment to OpenArch centres around the reconstruction of a medieval court dating from the time of one of Wales’s most famous princes, Llywelyn ap Iorwerth.

Museum volunteers as entrepreneurs inside an archaeological open-air museum

Over the last years, the Netherlands has seen an increase of unemployment, also under young professionals. Finding a job is difficult because companies have a hard time obtaining new clients and projects.

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